Giuseppe Mazzotti

THE GAMBRINUS “GIUSEPPE MAZZOTTI” PRIZE

FOR LITERATURE OF MOUNTAINS, MOUNTAINEERING, EXPLORATION-TRAVEL, ECOLOGY AND LANDSCAPE, TRADITIONAL CRAFTS AND WINDOW ON THE TRIVENETO REGION.

Giuseppe Mazzotti

Giuseppe Mazzotti, born at Treviso in 1907, was a journalist by profession and an active promoter of his home region of Veneto. He served on the committee of the Italian Touring Club, was chairman of the Treviso section of Italia Nostra, director of the Treviso Provincial Tourist Authority from its inception, member of the European Cultural Society, vice president of the Veneto Writers’ Association, honorary Inspector of Monuments, and delegate of the Italian Cookery Academy.  His home city of Treviso acknowledged his work with the “Città di San Liberale” Prize, awarded to the city.

He was passionately fond of mountaineering, a member of the Italian Alpine Club Academy, and author of numerous books on the subject, translated into various languages. In 1951 he was awarded the “Saint Vincent” Literary Prize for his book “Montagnes Valdôtaines”.

The French climber and writer E. R. Blanchet wrote about his “Grande Parete”: “Vous avez dans ces pages hallucinantes accompli le plus grand tour de force de toute la littérature alpine…”.

He organized important art exhibitions in Italy and abroad, including the first personal exhibition of painter Gino Rossi in 1933, and in 1967 acollection of the works of Arturo Martini (300 sculptures). He later contributed to publishing the artist’s letters.

In 1953 Mazzotti organized a ground-breaking exhibition (also shown in Milan, Rome, Paris, London, The Hague and Vienna) regarding the beautiful villas built on terra ferma in the 16th, 17th and 18th centuries by rich Venetian merchants.  The itinerant exhibition sparked off public opinion and started the movement that set up the Veneto Villa Authority to protect this unfortunately neglected magnificent heritage.

Long periods of his life were dedicated to local art exhibitions, Veneto castles, rustic buildings and many other historic-artistic constructions.

This fervid and passionate cultural activity inspired his colleagues to write: “Bepi dedicated his life to his homeland”.

He died at Treviso on 28 March 1981.